Black Hand

Black Hand

In turn-of-the-century New York, an Italian seeks vengeance on the mobsters who killed his father.

Now grown-up, Johnny Columbo returns to New York from Italy having sworn a vendetta against the Black Hand who killed his father years earlier. Becoming romantically involved with a girl ... . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

LinksNameQualitySeedersLeechers

Black Hand torrent reviews

Sophia H (kr) wrote: Monster High movies have actually been doing pretty well, the voice acting is great and the style of animation is really unique.Not to mention it may be girly but it's a million times better then the Barbie series, I would suggest watching some webisodes before trying out the movies, but if you're a casual movie goer I would suggest trying it out.Also the morals of the shows are great, it says you can be yourself no matter how strange you are or feel you are.

Matt G (mx) wrote: PPP is shooting for Napoleon-Dynamite-style quirky, but instead is mostly just hitting the stupid, made with more well-intentioned heart than actual skill. It's not completely unfunny, but Tsai in the lead role is a bit too irritating to follow for 96 mins.

Jesse B (fr) wrote: this aint no Weekend at Bernies, too bad,would have been a great spin off.

James H (kr) wrote: What a remarkable documentary, it would be impossible not to be moved by it. Excellent footage from the era, great and informative interviews.Excellent.

Alon G (gb) wrote: Great look into the Ghetto youth of france in the mid 90s

Edith N (ca) wrote: Power of a Really Lousy Soundtrack Okay. So I get that it's one way of making a species really alien. You come up with things that are poisonous to them which are commonplace to us. Differing chemical reactions for different species, right? So okay. The Newcomers get drunk on sour milk. I guess I can go there. The idea that they're really resistant to methane? Sure. Especially if you're going to go with the idea that they were specifically bred to be adaptable. However, that would almost certainly mitigate against their one great weakness, the thing which burns them like acid. M. Knight Shyamalan came up with part of the problem in [i]Signs[/i]--it was silly to have the aliens be allergic or whatever to water, because there's a great deal of water not just on Earth but, you know, in the universe. It's an easy compound to form. Similarly, and the problem here, is that salt is just two elements combined. I'm pretty sure it's way too common to be a reasonable poison. Some years ago, about the time the movie was made, the Newcomers came to Earth. It is now The Future, 1991, and the Newcomers are assimilating into Southern California as immigrants have been doing for hundreds of years. (Some better than others; ask the Chumash.) Detective Sergeant Matthew Sykes (the odious James Caan) and his partner, I. M. Doomed (Roger Aaron Brown), witness a run-of-the-mill robbery, only this time, Doomed gets killed in an event of Newcomer-on-Newcomer violence. This is so that Sykes can end up with a Newcomer partner. Which we knew would happen, because it's on the poster. Anyway, Sykes is taken off the convenience store case, the killing of his partner, as ought to happen. He volunteers to be partnered with "Sam Francisco" (the totally non-odious Mandy Patinkin), whom he renames George because he can't face the introductions. They are investigating a different murder; it's not as though there's only one murder in Los Angeles per night. But this one, of course, connects back. Okay. There are a few things I like about this movie, at least one of which was also explored in [i]District 9[/i]. Yes, here, we're talking humanoid aliens. However, we're talking humanoid aliens who have no control over or understanding of their own technology. They're a minority; no, they're not a small enough minority to be absorbed into Los Angeles almost unnoticed, but there are supposed to be 300,000 of them. Compared to even just the population of Los Angeles, even just the City of instead of the Greater Area, that's not a majority. It's a pretty hefty minority, but not the biggest by any stretch. And so there are prejudices and hatred and fear and so forth. Well done. George makes detective, let's face it, on an affirmative action program. And while Roger doesn't, I do understand why they've given them "funny names." It's a finely drawn detail in a cloudy movie, in fact--the names were given to them by humans who were running out and were amusing themselves. On the other hand, I do agree with Roger that they didn't really do much with the concept. I watched an episode or two of the TV show, but it didn't seem to think much, either. (I have one of the tie-in novels, and that's got some interesting stuff--but I'm missing a lot of what happened in the TV show and which is relevant.) Let's leave aside the saltwater thing real quick, shall we? There are still a lot of other differences which are important. George mentions in passing that his species cannot process cooked meat. That's one of the best parts of the movie; here is information about the Newcomers which is mentioned but not pointed out as a Huge Difference You Should Notice. The sour milk thing; how would food production change with the Newcomer arrival? George's family essentially doesn't make it onscreen at all. There's a drug, but isn't there always? There is nothing here which couldn't be any other minority group. The plot is interchangeable. Which is not to say Dwelling on the Alien is necessarily the best way to go. But honestly, I'm not even sure the new partner would have to be a minority. A rookie. Someone the guy has some reason to dislike or distrust or both. Someone Killed His Partner, and He's Looking for Revenge. If it's true that there are only seven plots, this is one of them. I think Joseph Campbell talked about it at one point. There's nothing interesting here. Really, it's a lot like the mediocre noirs I don't write reviews of. I watch them because it's a genre I like with some real gems, and every time, I hope I've found one. More often than not, I'm disappointed. Most of them, if I reviewed them, would rate at about a five or a six, which is why I don't usually bother to review them. They're just terribly neutral. Similarly, the only thing which makes this movie different from dozens of others, maybe hundreds, is some pretty impressive makeup.

Stephanie R (au) wrote: First off: Anna Anderson was not Anastasia, Second: These stories are similair just because it's about finding the real Anastasia. (anastsia actually died, he sisiter imght have lived)

Senor C (us) wrote: This seemed as good of places as any to start this year's Shocktober; I dig drive-ins and love horror movies so you'd figure I'd be in 7th heaven w/ this flix.. Unfortunately no. There's almost a certain charm about this though because it had about as much budget (maybe less because you only ever get to see a film being played on the screen @ the end & even then it's a western from the dawn of motion pictures) than any piece of schlock that played in the backwood drive-ins of the 70s; and the drive-in manger in this is a delightfully miserable son of a bitch. A few kills here and there (do some of them count as double since a couple of the victims were pregnant?) but most of this film is just filler (which is pretty bad because DIM is barely 70 minutes) including an extended scene where a killer w/ a machete is pursued through a warehouse (even though the Drive-In killer is doing people in w/ a sword) and in the end the true killer is never revealed; the audience is just supposed to live in fear that the Drive-In Killer may strike again w/out warning..Lame

Jason D (ca) wrote: Julia (Trish Everly) is a teacher for deaf children who has lived with the secret of a psychotic and abusive twin sister who has been hospitalized for several years. As their birthday draws near, Julia's sister escapes from the hospital and begins killing all of those closest to Julia, including the landlord, a deaf child (oh yeah, they go there), and some others. Julia's crazy sister isn't alone though; she's also got a rabid rottweiler doing most of the killing. Dare I say there may be a third killer involved? Dun Dun Duuuuun!! Anyways, There was a Little Girl (or Madhouse, the alternate title the movie was released under) was a decent surprise and effective slasher. That's not to say it had it's share of corny moments, such as the rottweiler clearly being a puppet in many scenes, not to mention the priest Uncle who does a little too much over-acting for this kind of movie. Still, this movie was fairly entertaining and worth the rental. I liked it.

Greg W (br) wrote: gr8 cast but not my cup-o-tea

Alex K (es) wrote: 1931's Dracula Is One Of My Favorite Films.