Ezhamathe Varavu

Ezhamathe Varavu

Set in the forests of Wayanad, Ezhamathe Varavu is a multilayered story that delineates the link between man and nature. It revolves around three principal characters — a planter, his wife and his friend. Gopi, a wealthy planter is an Alpha male, a hunter who assumes he knows the jungle and its creatures. Bhavana plays his long-suffering wife, who craves for his company and affection. Into their turbulent marriage comes Vineeth, an archaeologist on a dig in Wayanad. He turns out to be her college beau. Kavitha plays a tribal who introduces Vineeth to the forests and its inhabitants.

Set in the forests of Wayanad, Ezhamathe Varavu is a multilayered story that delineates the link between man and nature. It revolves around three principal characters — a planter, his wife and his friend. Gopi, a wealthy planter is an Alpha male, a hunter who assumes he knows the jungle and its creatures. Bhavana plays his long-suffering wife, who craves for his company and affection. Into their turbulent marriage comes Vineeth, an archaeologist on a dig in Wayanad. He turns out to be her college beau. Kavitha plays a tribal who introduces Vineeth to the forests and its inhabitants. . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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Ezhamathe Varavu torrent reviews

thomas m (es) wrote: Better than decent at the begging but quickly runs out of steam

Frank F (ca) wrote: A very nice ending, but it takes quite a while to build up momentum.

Jesse O (fr) wrote: This movie is really good. I really liked it, but there was just something that kept this movie from reaching greatness. I can't quite put my finger on it. I think it's the fact that there's a lack of interaction between Rico and Sonny. They are just not in that many scenes together and when they do interact with each other is just for brief moments. There was probably a period of 20-30 minutes in which Jamie's character wasn't on screen. Other than that and the fact that the dialogue is not that strong I still find this to be a really good summer movie. The directing is again fantastic in typical Michael Mann fashion. It feels like you're there with the action. For example during the last shoot-out scene (which is absolutely fantastic) there's a part where blood is squirted and the blood falls on the camera and the cameraman moves as though he were there with the action. Also I liked the fact that the blood that was squirted stayed on the camera, it was a nice little touch. Collateral is still a 1000 times better but as I read in a review a solid Michael Mann films still beats anything else that is out there.

Kenny O (fr) wrote: A funny Aussie flick!!!!

Coleman M (jp) wrote: This underrated film is intense, intriguing, and although has a few bumps on the way is still a very enjoyable movie. And who can turn down Morgan Freeman?

Gareth H (br) wrote: An aside: one time some friends I were watching some very late night public access television back in Arizona when suddenly without warning, ALF was on... only different. There was a timecode across the bottom of the screen and the episode hadn't been scored or postdubbed, which means no laugh track. It was undubbed underground bootleg ALF! Everytime ALF talked there was a long pause afterwards. It was like a nightmare alternative universe ALF in which laughter was forbidden. ALF turns surreal without it. I didn't know where the jokes were. It was the episode in which ALF suspects Mr. Ochmonek of killing Mrs. Ochmonek, Rear Window-style. ALF wakes Willy and wife telling them what he saw. Willy tells ALF he's crazy and jumping to conclusions and then offers a series of rational explainations for Mr. Ochmonek to be carrying an ice pick across the living room. ALF says "Oh, yeah, maybe they were playing ice pick bingo! (long pause)." I think that was a joke.Project: ALF misses the mark by abandoning the ALF/Wily dynamic in favour of relationship between ALF & the US military. A friend described the ALF/Wily relationship as demonstrating a Hegelian dialectic. I think the implications are far more radical. Because it isn't so much that ALF is Willy's negation, but rather as a sign of everything not-Willy--and not of this world--ALF signals the total artifice of Willy's existence, and potentially (if pursued beyond the artifice the laugh track signals) oursIf Hegel's master-slave dialectic plays itself out through Willy and ALF, it does so ONLY as play. ALF is intelligible by way of the miracle of personification--to say nothing of imagination of the Jim Henson Creature Shop, creative camera placement and the selective use of a little person in an ALF suit. That is, through the tools of artifice. The laugh track is part of this. The laugh track emasculates Willy, radically negating him and subsuming his existence within the pervasive artificiality that permeates fiction. In this, we find the impossibility of Willy ever achieving a sense of his own self-consciousness or at the most extreme, existence itself.Being television, with the specific demands of the medium, this artifice effect is heightened. The laugh tack defuses the threat to existence that ALF constitutes by way of his very being. The only tact is to deny ALF's existence in the first place, which de facto denies Willy's existence; while at the same time appealing to the universality of and "humanity" of both, through the experience and bodily sensation of laughter, in its imitation. ALF is "funny," therefore humanish--and the irony is of that amusement can be present only as imitation (unless ALF is actually to be found funny on a subjective and singular basis, which is very difficult to theorize in a Hegelian mode). Laughter universalizes ALF, but laughter itself is only present as artifice. For theorizing that you have to turn not to Hegel, but to Bergson's work of laughter, or other theories of sensation.On the other hand, it is as though the laugh track is the only trace of order in the series--through the blatant artifice of laughter some binding order is asserted. However, removing the laughter--as I noted--only signals its absence, which runs the risk of heightening the artifice effect and may well be the sign of the absolute infinite negativity that I myself seem to be desire.Hence, Hegel and dialectics are not really en vogue at the dawn of the 21st century, except in their (academic) novelty they offer easily distractible grad students as a means of theorizing impossible absolutes. There is no way to free Willy from this artifice, just as there is no way that we can free ourselves. Post-hence, I really want to finish my philosophy paper or cease to exist.

Anna (br) wrote: It was a great movie, but quite sad!

Darren H (br) wrote: If you liked Boston Public...

oliver m (us) wrote: Masterpiece! The script, ways of story telling, acting, cinematography were all perfect! It took a while to kick in on how good it actually was but this is one I will remember in years to come and has been added to my top 50!

Patrick D (de) wrote: Another decent Bollywood in a sea of crap.

Adrian B (jp) wrote: Questionably odd documentary on the isolated cousins of late president John F. Kennedy. These ladies, mother Edith Ewing Bouvier Beale and daughter Edith Ewing Beale, lived in an isolated home along the East Hampton, New York coastline (I actually thought it was along the coast in either North or South Caroline for some reason). There is infested with bugs, rodents, and cats, and do they care? No! Essentially, their nuts! There is no other way to describe these ladies, who seem to be engaged in a real love/hate relationship and treat everyone around very peculiarly. Disturbingly, it's like the relationship between my mother and my grandmother, although they are not that isolated or psychotic. I can sadly relate in a way. Brrrrrr...Mother Ewing died two years after the documentary was released, while daughter Ewing passed away in 2002. Both lived into their eighties despite this less than appealing life style.