Inside Deep Throat

Inside Deep Throat

In 1972, a seemingly typical shoestring budget pornographic film was made in a Florida hotel, "Deep Throat," starring Linda Lovelace. This film would surpass the wildest expectation of everyone involved to become one of the most successful independent films of all time. It caught the public imagination which met the spirit of the times, even as the self appointed guardians of public morality struggled to suppress it, and created, for a brief moment, a possible future where sexuality in film had a bold artistic potential. This film covers the story of the making of this controversial film, its stunning success, its hysterical opposition along with its dark side of mob influence and allegations of the on set mistreatment of the film's star. In short, the combined events would redefine the popular appeal of pornography, even as more cynical developments would lead it down other paths.

More than 30 years after Deep Throat's provocative debut, this documentary examines the legacy that the most profitable film of all-time left on society. . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

LinksNameQualitySeedersLeechers

Inside Deep Throat torrent reviews

Jalen M (nl) wrote: They just keep getting worse with ridiculous characters and terrible dialogue and a decent ending that ties in with the rest of the franchise. D

Conrad T (ag) wrote: Did not see any smart plot at all.

Aaron O (nl) wrote: Sound Of My Voice is an original and ambitious mystery film that's both refreshingly and annoyingly ambiguous, but it's still consistently involving and has quite a potent atmosphere throughout, and Brit Marling is absolutely brilliant as the leader of the cult, Maggie.

Buggy B (ca) wrote: This was a surprise hit for me because it started out really weird, low budget art-housie even but developed into a unique and thought-provoking dystopian romance. I only bothered with this initially because I saw Ewan McGregor's name attached, but I'm glad I persevered, he and Eva Green do an excellent job together with the material -which I would think would require some serious trust in your director as they lose each of their 5 senses and eat lipstick, mustard, soap and whole raw fish between moments of violence, sadness and several love scenes. (Yeah that happens). Oh and how fun was it to see McGregor on screen with Ewen Bremner (Trainspotting) again.Anyways, McGregor plays a likable chef who enters into a relationship with a scientist just as a global disorder begins to rob the masses of their senses. The first to go is smell, then taste, touch, sound and finally sight. Each deficit is presaged by some kind of emotional breakdown. Eva's character provides insight through narration as chaos ensues and authorities try to maintain order in a changed world. The ending of this is just...wow. I've been thinking about it for days now, well that and the binge eating frenzy. So yeah, not a fantastic movie but worth checking out for originality, decent acting and an ending that will leave you considering. 11/8/14

Ian G (nl) wrote: One of the motion capture/animation hybrid films that came out of Imagemovers Digital overseen by Robert Zemeckis, it mainly benefits from the sophistication of the art direction and layout of the images even if the actual realism of the human characters still need some work which is usually the problem with the younger studios, Monster House focuses on a house across the street from a boy that he and his friends feel has become possessed by the home owner after his accidental death after an encounter with the lead. While a cool idea and the design on the house itself is pretty cool, the articulation of the kids is very stuck in the 80's who come across as bratty at times, making me wonder if the screenplay was a leftover from Amblin's heydey back in the 80's or at the very least an apparent tribute to the Goonies and the like. Made me a little meh as to connecting with the characters outside of the old man living at the house. Doesnt come close to Polar Express or Beowolf which are the top end of the spectrum for the studio but doesn't fall as low as the studio breaker Mars Needs Mom's. Mixed.

Courtney H (fr) wrote: not as good as funny girl, but its nice to send how it all ends. really sad though.

Peter P (nl) wrote: Outstanding classic movie. Capra does an incredible job coveying a feeling of well being through film. Plus they use a clip from the plane scene in the Opus and Bill Christmas movie, "A Wish For Wings That Work", so that is awesome too.

Robert B (nl) wrote: Salt of the Earth (Herbert J. Biberman, 1953)It occurred to me sometime after I had watched it that it would have been a great idea to co-review Salt of the Earth, Herbert Biberman's muckraking 1953 film about the Empire Zinc Mine strike in southwestern New Mexico, and Dreams of Dust, Laurent Salgues' 2006 drama about Nigerian immigrants who turn to gold mining in Burkina Faso to make a living. Unfortunately, by the time I came up with that idea, I had long completed my Dreams of Dust review, but if you've seen one of them, you would do yourself a service seeking the other one out. For two movies that couldn't be more different on a meta level, they work as a fantastic double-bill.Biberman's movie is a thinly-veiled portrait of the events surrounding the 1951 strike at a mine in Bayard, a town in southwestern New Mexico (now a Superfund site). Thanks to a combination of its location (Bayard sits very close to the Mexican border) and stinginess, Empire had a tendency to hire a large number of Latino workers. This is, of course, not a terrible thing, and you would imagine that in today's world the company would be crowing about its diversity. All well and good except that it got out that Empire were paying the Latino miners a fraction of what they were paying the gringos. This led to the Latino workers going on strike. The movie covers the lead-up to the strike more than the thing itself, though it does devote some time at the end to the actual strike. That was kind of a gutsy move in the fifties, and it works pretty well.Looking back on the movie seventy years later, it can be hard to separate the meta from the actual movie. There is a great deal of meta surrounding this picture. Most of the principals in front of the camera were non-actors (and, unthinkable in Hollywood at the time, most of the actors playing Mexicans were actual Mexicans), while four of the principals behind the camera were blacklisted. (So was the movie itself, the only film in American history to actually be blacklisted; ironically, it is also the only American film that was released theatrically in China between 1950 and 1979. It would not be shown theatrically in America until the mid-sixties.) All of which makes it great on trivia night, but is it good for movie night? It's not a bad little movie, to be sure, but I think the meta has caused it to be lionized maybe a little more than it should. The non-actors do a good job for non-actors, but Cidade de Deus this ain't. Will Geer, as a local sheriff tasked with quelling the natives, brings a touch of professionalism to the proceedings, and male lead Juan Chacn really does rise to the occasion, but the two of them often have the unintentional effect of highlighting the amateurs around them. That said, that we're seventy years on also makes the film fit a little better. After all, we live in an age where any student filmmaker with a digital camcorder and a DVD-R burner can get a movie streaming on Netflix, so Salt of the Earth is a little more at home. Worth looking into if you're interested in the subject. ***

Bastien M (nl) wrote: Ca commence comme un bon Hitchcock : un pauvre quidam, sur base d'une rencontre fortuite et d'une erreur de bagages, va se retrouver mele a une histoire de jalousie et de meurtres. L'introduction laisse meme presager, avec ce train luttant contre les courants d'eau une nuit d'orage, a du bon fantastique. En fait, il n'en sera rien : le film virera tres vite dans le policier bacle et le melodrame tirant en longueur. Tant d'elements meritaient d'etre developpes et sont laisses a l'abandon. Tourneur, visiblement, ne sais pas gerer le budget qu'on lui a octroye cette fois. Reste quelques bons moments mais une histoire trop pale (surtout qu'Hitchcock et Cukor feront bien mieux sur le mme principe de manipulation de la conjointe pour la rendre folle) pour prtendre atteindre le niveau de La Feline ou I Walked with a Zombie.

Jacob M (au) wrote: Essential viewing for all Whovians.

Shane D (mx) wrote: Another film that suffered by having a competitor released at the same time (RED PLANET) this really isn't that bad of a film (where RED PLANET was). Gary Sinise as a leading man is retrospectively an interesting choice - but surrounded by Cheadle and Robbins, he manages. Space movies when made well enough get an automatic tick from me and having only recently watched GRAVITY, I see plenty of reasons why this isn't nearly as bad as it's remembered. Whilst a fair amount of belief is required to be suspended - the action leading up to the rescue landing on Mars is pretty cool. What makes the film for me is it's ending - Sinise heading off to travel the universe whilst corny, I really enjoy. It's no Apollo 13 but its far more enjoyable than time has given it credit for (in my books anyway).

Rico K (fr) wrote: fantastic movie, very good acting from all including rapper cam'ron but the ending was a little rushed .

David G (us) wrote: the best Resident Evil film currently available.

Taryn F (nl) wrote: We give it a zero, it sucked so badly, there was absolutely no point to it what so ever!