Mojave Phone Booth

Mojave Phone Booth

In the middle of the Mojave desert rests an abandoned phone booth, riddled with bullet holes, graffiti, its windows broken, but otherwise functioning. Its identity was born on the Internet and for years, travelers would make the trek down a lonely dirt road and camp next to the booth, in the hopes that it might suddenly ring, and they could connect with a stranger (often from another country) on the other end of the line. This is the story of four disparate people whose lives intersect with this mystical outpost, and the comfort they seek from a stranger's voice: There is Beth, a troubled woman facing dilemmas with her love-life and a recurring, baffling crime; Mary, a young South African, who is contemplating selling her body for the funds to escape her dreadful existence; Alex, a woman who is losing her lover, Glory, to the belief she is plagued by aliens, and Richard, driven into desperation by a separation from his wife, who happens upon the booth after his failed suicide attempt.

In the middle of the Mojave desert rests an abandoned phone booth, riddled with bullet holes, graffiti, its windows broken, but otherwise functioning. Its identity was born on the Internet ... . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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Mojave Phone Booth torrent reviews

Mark W (nl) wrote: Not really much of a movie, but it's a treat if you're a fan of voice actors.

Kathleen W (ca) wrote: This film uses the phrase 'bio-gender warfare'. Tilda Swinton is on screen most of the time. It's really funny and at first you think it's not meant to be funny, but finally you realise that, it is. "Can a human get a computer virus?" "Yes", the scientist responds. This is sci-fi that isn't trying to convince you. It makes you nostalgic for an earlier internet that never really existed. TIlda Swinton is on screen most of the time. Are her wigs meant to be terrible? How did this film get made? I'm glad it did.

Dave J (de) wrote: Thursday, October 21, 2010 (1986) Betty Blue (In French with English subtitles) DRAMA All this is, is an erotic variation of a much older movie called "Of Human Bondage" made in 1934! The story of a successful novelist and his strange attachment with a self-absorbed, fanatic young teenager which the novelist tries to do his best to please her- the guy in this film is like her little bitch! Saw this film on VHS rental and was thinking that their is nothing appealing about seeing a crazy lunatic acting out on her agressions when she should've been locked up in the first place even if the film's intentioned was to sympathize with her character which I ended up not caring anymore before the credits even started rolling! Very exhausting character study which doesn't resolve anything! 1.5 out of 4 stars

Mitch S (jp) wrote: If you like rock and roll stars, then this movie is for you. just try to count the cameos of rock legends that walk on and off camera.

Chris S (fr) wrote: The pedophile that made this movie apparently thought kids would like it more if he added something that wasn't in the book. So he added algae? That's right, the young hero of the movie is obsessed with algae. It is his passion. He elaborates this sentiment several times in voice-overs. Sometimes I think about this movie at night, and I have to bite my pillow to keep from screaming in horror.

Blake P (fr) wrote: Take away its subtitles and 2010's "Point Blank" is as American an action film as any - think a little "Mission: Impossible" (1996) intermixed with "Saboteur" (1942) era Hitchcock. A wronged man thriller tighter than Teyana Taylor's tummy, the film stars Giles Lellouche as Samuel Pierret, a nurse's aid who finds himself mixed up in a race against time after he saves the life of a gangster (Roschdy Zem) following an assassination attempt. His pregnant wife (Elena Anaya) held hostage by murderous goons until he safety escorts the man in question to his conglomerate of thugs, Samuel's forced to become his own version of a thrill-seeking Tom Cruise. "Point Blank's" more than just a straightforward game of cat and mouse - also central is a subplot that involves corruption at the hands of law enforcement agents - but at a brisk eighty-four minutes is it uncomplicatedly a pulse pounder worth remembering, with no cinematic fat to deter its constant gut punches and no languid operatic pauses to dampen its lightning pace. It's all action fused with just enough dramatic nuance to render it as exciting and emotional - every bullet counts, and every twist is soaked in a covering of stakes we'd rather end in relief than tragedy. While its sequences of action are death-defying to the "Bourne" caliber, brilliantly shot and dependably harrowing to their very core, it's the performances by Lellouche and Zem we remember. Respectively frazzled and suavely 007-esque, the juxtaposition between Samuel's everyman ineptness and Hugo's cool malice makes the duo a compelling odd couple both desperate to make it to the other side for wildly different reasons that surprisingly resemble one another in their life or death urgency. Both have the in-the-moment physicality necessary for the genre in question; their characterizational believability is but a supplemental component that makes them anti-heroes whose lack of invincibility makes them all the more enthralling to behold. It shares the same name as the haunting John Boorman directed psychological thriller starring Lee Marvin, bearing no similarity in content. But arguably comparative is both films' fascinating following of men severely fucked over, with Marvin taking matters into his own hands in an effort to make right, and with Lellouche metamorphosing into someone he isn't as a way to ensure the safety of both himself and the woman he loves. In both "Point Blanks" do we see protagonists pushed to their breaking points. How they deal with their personal setbacks is thoroughly hypnotizing. Consider the 2010 film to be the more optimistic of the two.

Rafiiqaa H (jp) wrote: Clever insight in exploring the different stereotypes of black people and unchallenged racism that is still present through humour and jokes. As there is always some truth behind every joke.