Naram Garam

Naram Garam

Ramprasad is appointed as a house-keeper for Bhavani Shankar Bajpai's ancestral home, won after a hard-fought legal battle. Ramprasad wants to marry Kusum but cannot as he doesn't earn enough or has a decent place to live. Circumstances change and Kusum and her father come and live in the Bhavani Shankar's ancestral home. Bhavani Shankar, his brother and Bhavani Shankar's manager come one by one to evict the trespassers and are infatuated by Kusum. Ramprasad somehow manages to deal with all of them and marries Kusum after assurances to better pay and a nice place to live.

An impoverished employee tries to prevent his superiors and employers from marrying his sweetheart. . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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Naram Garam torrent reviews

Al M (es) wrote: Framed as a reality show gone bad, HazMat is a reasonably entertaining slasher that doesn't do anything truly original but is engaging for slasher fans nonetheless...

Roxanne C (ca) wrote: I thought this movie was funny...more of a Sunday afternoon movie then a Friday night movie..

Eve F (es) wrote: I have been scarred for life for no reason.

Gabe S (mx) wrote: A horrifying concept..and something that anyone living in a major city should be prepared for on some level.

Greg M (ca) wrote: Strong plot interesting, strong cast. Better plot then Color of Money, worst sound track

Helen H (jp) wrote: Didn't really like this depiction of King David.

Jim L (au) wrote: Cool film! Nothing too deep or heavy here. The music by George Harrison is truely very good. Some nice visuals and humorous characters. Worth watching. Only a trailer as extras on DVD (apart from the plot in text & biogs).

Bethany M (kr) wrote: Any film that can take a man like Will Ferrell and characterize him as the most boring IRS agent the world has ever seen is obviously not intended to be a bucket of laughs. But this interesting take on the funny man's persona actually gives the story an inviting edge. Although not altogether hilarious, the literary nuances and witty humour that is often employed serves as a decent substitute for comedic relief. The back and forth banter that goes on between Ferrell and other characters is equally amusing. First, you have the despising, anarchist baker played by Maggie Gyllenhaal, and then the insightful literary critic (reminiscent of a wise old owl) who is played by who other than Dustin Hoffman. Stranger Than Fiction is a modern tale taking place in what appears to be a major city. Most of its inhabitants seem to lead fairly uninterrupted lives, that is, apart from Harold Crick. This character, played by Ferrell, is haunted by the ongoing narration of his life; a voice poignantly cast as Emma Thompson. The audience undergoes the impression that he must be going crazy until we actually discover that this British narrator exists in the flesh. She is no longer the voice in Harold's head, she is the voice to Harold's world. The dismality of Harold's life is reawakened when the authoress has him introduced to Ana Pascal (Gyllenhaal), the fiery young baker. Harold's determination to find this elusive narrator, and his interactions with Miss. Pascal lead him on an entertaining path to self discovery, to which he learns that it is perfectly acceptable to live a little; whether it's picking up a mint green guitar and rocking out, making lemon chiffon cake, or going to space camp. The employment of special effects in the movie affords its viewers an element of fun. The way the meticulous tally of numbered brushstrokes floats above Harold's head as he brushes his teeth, or the levels of a soap dispenser being shown depleted with use in a bathroom; all this serves as a funny way in which Harold's life is closely documented. Not only is it a source of documentation and fun, it is a source of character. This technological display of numbers and shapes are very much like Harold himself, a man obsessed with order and detail. While this film element contributes to fastidiousness, the warmth that we discover in the movie's characters and environment is also developed in a number of other ways. The comfort of the bakery takes precedence in its warm yellowed hues and gentle lighting, as well as the stonework outside and the beautiful round, wide window. The clutter of the literary critic's office is offset by the towering bookshelves and comfortable nook by the windows, furnished with brown leather chairs and sofas. The warmth of the characters is also expressed, and while Karen Eiffel (Thompson) does not naturally ooze rainbows and good feeling, her assistant, Penny (Latifah), seems capable of taming her wild antics. It is a film worth enjoying. Nothing entirely brilliant, but the message is encouraging and entertaining. Harold's documentation of comedy vs. tragedy, Ana Pascal's chocolate chip cookies and Jules Hilbert's incessant coffee drinking speak of readily likeable characters, which in turn allows for a very likeable film. On a scale of love to hate, I give it a like, but more of a warm, happy kind of like.

Stanley C (jp) wrote: The movie's character development of Soo Yung, the film's damsel-in-distress and main point of conflict, is entirely flat and monotonic which makes it acidic towards the script quality of a movie relying on such a character to build up plot. However, Lee and Carter are dynamic in going from enemies to desperate partners getting outmanned by several evil kung-fu or gun masters, making Rush Hour decent to watch even if martial arts isn't a perfect topic for a law enforcement-oriented movie nor is an additional subplot for explosives and bombs just for kicks.