That's Cunning! Shijo saidai no sakusen

That's Cunning! Shijo saidai no sakusen

Comedy about a group of chemistry students who organize a cheating scam during their final exams. Amuro Namie, the top pop music sensation, plays one of the students.

Comedy about a group of chemistry students who organize a cheating scam during their final exams. Amuro Namie, the top pop music sensation, plays one of the students. . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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That's Cunning! Shijo saidai no sakusen torrent reviews

Sammy M (ru) wrote: If you are a big katy perry stan like me you will love this documentary as much as I did.4.5\5 Almost perfect.

Massod P (br) wrote: It was the worst documentary ever!!!!!!!!!!!!

Zachary D (ca) wrote: This is a decent thriller and a good TV movie! The acting may be bad, but the story line is unpredictable! If you watch this that means (1) you love slasher films with horny teenagers or (2) love really clichd psychological thrillers! I am a victim of number 1!

Jac K (fr) wrote: How can such talented writers and great cast produce such a dire film... What went wrong!?

Karthik V (jp) wrote: Its pretty alright. slapstick comedy with a dose of suspense and action.

David S (mx) wrote: Who wrote that movie seriously !

Jason F (fr) wrote: While the production value was low and the performances mediocre, the theme was well-developed and interesting. And I really did LOL at least once. The music videos that punctuated the movie were a real treat, too.

Dragutin A (ca) wrote: heheheh, maybe 20 years ago

Bonlie K (de) wrote: Wow! I loved this movie, very realistic and not pulling any punches.. The portrait of life in early 70 s Britain and council housing was amazing..A beautiful movie

Thomas O (gb) wrote: A beautiful marriage between the two richest art forms known to man

Jap O (es) wrote: A nice adaptation. Funny. But there should be more actions in it.

Art S (gb) wrote: Late film from Robert ("Nanook of the North") Flaherty who is well known for "staging" his documentaries, thereby capturing the ecstatic truth rather than the accountant's truth (as Werner Herzog might have it). Here, Flaherty makes no bones about casting his nonprofessional (and therefore "real") actors in a loose "fictional" story about a young Cajun boy who observes oil-drilling wildcatters in the bayou. The plot's suspense lies in the failure of the well to produce for most of the film, until the boy superstitiously throws salt and spits in the well to bring luck. A subplot involves his pet raccoon that may or may not have gotten himself eaten by a giant alligator. The story, simplified to sub-Disney levels and with very little dialogue, is not the point here. Instead, viewers are advised just to gawk at the amazing images of the bayou and the oil rig (shot by Richard Leacock) and to see how the principles of montage are used in action (e.g., shot of boy looking; shot of alligator swimming; shot of boy's alarmed reaction). Even the chase sequences (alligator vs. raccoon and boy vs. alligator vs. father) use cross-cutting as D. W. Griffith would have, in order to keep things moving and to keep us interested. Overall, something seems missing, however - maybe the real Louisiana? Selected for the National Film Registry in the Library of Congress.