Thomas Kinkade's Christmas Cottage

Thomas Kinkade's Christmas Cottage

A look at the inspiration behind Thomas Kinkade's painting The Christmas Cottage, and how the artist was motivated to begin his career after discovering his mother was in danger of losing their family home.

A look at the inspiration behind Thomas Kinkade's painting The Christmas Cottage, and how the artist was motivated to begin his career after discovering his mother was in danger of losing their family home. . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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Thomas Kinkade's Christmas Cottage torrent reviews

Joachim G (nl) wrote: A wonderful film about a wonderful womanA wonderful movie! A wonderful woman!

Ruben D (jp) wrote: Very good and very shocking

Jerome Y (fr) wrote: Good entertainment...

Laurent B (fr) wrote: Une bonne grosse comedie japonaise ou l'on retrouve tout les ingredients et les signes comiques nippons a savoir exageration, intrusion de mots et onomatopees dans l'image, mimiques tres expressives. On passe un bon moment avec ce film qui parvient a decrire assez bien le monde des Maiko et des geishas tout en laissant la place a une comedie qui confine souvent a la grosse grosse deconnade mais toujours avec une certaine mesure. L'exageration des situations et le jeu tres expressif de l'acteur principal y est pour beaucoup.

Tommy F (ru) wrote: very gritty, makes you want to take a bath after watching it (that's how much the story draws you in) very good, i recommend it...

Hiawatha B (br) wrote: Sentimental and at times implausible, but quite entertaining.

Mark D (kr) wrote: Rarely has a making-of documentary prompted me to so strongly re-evaluate the original film itself and what it stands for quite so much as did "Overnight". This fly-on-the-wall doc is a chronicle of the almost unbelievably fast rise and fall of writer/director Troy Duffy, a bartender who was selected by Miramax president Harvey Weinstein to direct and produce a multi-million-dollar film based on his own original script entitled "The Boondock Saints," and ended up being blacklisted by every major studio in Hollywood. Beginning as a standard making-of doc, "Overnight" quickly becomes something much more: a revealing and often slanderous look at the private life of an egotistical, arrogant douchebag who is given the greatest opportunity imaginable and ends up alienating everyone around him and imploding his own career before it even begins. It becomes quite apparent early on in the pre-production talks surrounding "Saints" that Duffy's immediate rise to fame has gone to his head. He is seen burning bridges left and right, never realizing the consequences of his abrasive attitude and egotism until it is too late. He leverages his fame in the film world to get his (crappy) band a record deal with Atlantic, signing on for multiple albums including a soundtrack for the film. He then begins to loose sight of his main opportunity, snubbing those around him who aren't in his band (including the doc-makers) by putting them down emotionally and withholding money from them, while the band rolls in cash from their record deal. Duffy is shown drinking heavily every night and making a complete ass of himself with the bandmates, while his film begins to slip through his fingers during the day. It is not long before Harvey Weinstein pulls out of the project, leaving Duffy without the help of Miramax (or any other major studio thanks to Harvey's death-grip over the industry). From here we witness Duffy's continued downfall as everything he had going for him falls through (even after he still makes the film!) and he refuses to realize that he is the one who is causing his own self-destruction.In the end, "Overnight" isn't an exceptionally enjoyable watch, mostly because of how irritating Duffy and some of his bandmates are. However, it chronicles one of the most unique rise-and-fall stories in the history of Hollywood, and serves as an incredibly powerful cautionary tale about the fickle nature of the film industry and the destructive power of excessive self-pride.

Jon D (nl) wrote: Do you find yourself not asking the question, "What the hell am I looking at?" as much as you'd like? Then look no further than the movie Cartoon Noir! Contained within, you'll find: -A couple eating a monkey -Alien nose rapists -A mannequin falling down stairs -A guy with a dead hooker, a magic table, and a clock -Something about a cat -A smoker whose ashtray is much happier than sheFilming techniques range from live action to animation to a textile mill. The audio quality ranges from decent to recordings of crumpled up paper. If you're looking to confuse and/or profoundly disturb someone, look this title up.

Sok H (fr) wrote: Erm... Huh? Gay Lover?

Mark B (ca) wrote: How many assholes can you put in one movie? Vertical Limit is better.

Ken S (kr) wrote: Hal Ashby directs Peter Sellers in one of the finest performances of his career, as a simple minded mild mannered Gardner named Chance, who becomes the unlikely aid and friend of a wealthy Business man and then a political insider in D.C. after he is forced to leave his home after the man he worked for passes away. It is a little bit satire, slightly fantastic, and highly enjoyable. Hal Ashby is is probably one of the most unsung heroes of cinema from the 1970s. I enjoyed every frame of this, and while I didn't laugh at every moment, when I did laugh it was always a big laugh.

Gregory W (ag) wrote: final Flame out at WB

Art S (fr) wrote: Through the murk of both picture and soundtrack, it is still possible to make out that this is an Alfred Hitchcock film. Sort of. The problem is that the Master seems unfocused. He uses montage as well as he ever did - to create a spoof of "the old dark house" genre, for example - but then he leaves characters standing around in a group talking for what seems like eons. This may be a result of the transition to sound that meant that actors needed to hover under or around hidden microphones - but Hitch had already demonstrated that he could be clever with sound (e.g., Blackmail, 1929). Instead, the root cause of the problem is probably the underlying play based on misrepresentation and confusion of identities amongst criminals and detectives involved in the theft of a necklace. I was confused too. Leon M. Lion is along for cockney comic relief but the major attraction is a finale which sees a bus and train rush pell-mell toward the Thames (I think) with cops on one and robbers on the other until they barrel into a ferry and the denouement begins. Unfortunately, the whole thing is so clearly a set of models that suspension of disbelief is impossible. But undoubtedly Hitch didn't care; fortunately, his best pictures were still ahead of him.

Megan T (it) wrote: Denzel and Walhberg make for a great team. It's funny, action packed, with a mystery plot. All good ingredients that play out well.

Liam C (gb) wrote: After watching the film I understand why it is called what it is but when I first found out about this film, I thought it would be about another kind of Pride. Still, Pride is a very involving sports drama that success on its great acting.When I read that it had clichs and was a sports film, I already had an idea of what it would be, it would have really 2 dimensional characters, the underdogs who go from losers to winners in a single montage and just a really simplistic story with no real conflict. This film had none of that. All of the main characters are very complex and well written, the main character, Jim Ellis, is a very realistic person, he isn't just a cardboard cut out hero, no, he is complex and has layers to him. Terrence Howard, as usual, gives a fantastic performance where you can really feel where he is coming from and Bernie Mac gave a very good performance too and you really felt where he was coming from too. They do share some funny lines with each other after their initial conflict at the start and the script has some good jokes for them whenever it's needed. The swim team, who are mostly unknowns, are good and all give good performances without ever coming off as flat. Some of them do have their 'thing' that makes them easily recognisable before actually knowing who they are but this is based on a true story and even though I'm probably kidding myself because we all know how Hollywood likes to change things, so I'd like to believe that their 'thing' wasn't just made up for the film but who knows. The only real problem I do have is with Tom Arnold's character, which certainly is an odd choice for this role but he really did not have much to him, he wasn't flat out a cartoon character as to be fair he does have some slight growth throughout the film, as does his team, but he's just there! And you don't really know all that much about him, but he isn't the focus of the film nor is in it all that much anyway so it doesn't really matter. Even with that, he wasn't an over the top stereotype that reviewers make him out to be, I can't even begin to imagine how it was to be an African-American living in 1974. There were some points where some of the acting was a bit off but that was by people who were in the film maybe about 2 minutes but that's just a nitpick someone like me would look out for. The development of how they went from a bunch of friends to a swim team was really well done, it didn't just happen over night or in a montage like I mentioned earlier, they have lessons, they have conflict, they have sad moments and everything else in between. It'll look like everything is coming together and then it goes in another direction and then they have to deal with that, it was done well. The only thing I really noticed that was a clich was that the team gets told off one night and the next day after someone wakes up, they hear the team swimming as they get serious and start learning properly, I've seen that done before lots of times but that lasts barely a minute. The swim scenes are very intense and exciting to watch, especially the last one, as it should be. The soundtrack is good and didn't overburden any scene to force an emotion on the audience, it accompanied what happened on screen well.While it might have conflict and have complex characters in a good story, it is quite predictable just in terms of the ending, you know what will happen and especially because it's based on a true story, but here it works because it has strong, powerful moments and it's a good experience that doesn't take anything away from anybody, and the film itself is unique, a film about an African-American swim team? Can't say I've seen many of those. I have seen some terribly clichd films and, at least to me, this wasn't one of them. It shows you what your emotions want to see, which would usually be a bad thing but it feels like you've been on a real journey after all is said and done and it's a good story that should be told, it's nice, well made and made me smile and that's all I can ask. During the credits it shows the real Jim Ellis and it's really good to see real footage of what he has been doing.THIS IS OUR HOUSE, COACH!