Two Soldiers

Two Soldiers

A story about the friendship between two young men, two soldiers - Arkady from Odessa and Sasha from Ural.

A story about the friendship between two young men, two soldiers - Arkady from Odessa and Sasha from Ural. . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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Two Soldiers torrent reviews

walter w (ag) wrote: Very good performances and engaging drama.

Nicola W (fr) wrote: A fun pirate adventure with a dodo!

Parker M (it) wrote: 2 Stars out of 4 Morgan Spurlock searches for Osama Bin Laden the way Vladimir and Estragon searched for Godot. Like those two, what Spurlock seeks is not the answer though he'd like to find it. It's a documentary where he travels across 8 Middle Eastern countries but really goes nowhere. The whole joke is Spurlock is not going to find Osama, because if he did what would he say? The film makes its point by accomplishing nothing. But Where In the World? does not fit in the documentary's world. It's too naive, simplistic, and obvious. What it sets out to do is very clever on the surface but it is not essential. Spurlock, in order to tease his topic more than learn about it, spends most of his time poking fun and pushing at stereotypes rather than raising them. The point of rhetoric he wants to make is that he wants to live in a world where he can raise his child, who is currently in the tummy of his now wife Alexandra. Basically, Where In the World? is a 90-minute video of giving birth. Spurlock does this documentary to convince us that the world is an unsafe place. I mean I think so. He is very worried about travelling to Egypt, Morocco, Israel, Palestine, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. Since he is American, will he live? Will he be chased to India? Will the camels bite? These are terrible questions but that is what the documentary does. It believes in Middle Eastern stereotypes, starts to question them, and then makes fun of them by the end. Spurlock is not saying anything important other than "the Middle Eastern's are not who we thought they were". Most liberal people know that. Where In the World? has the craft of Spurlock's earlier Super Size Me, which was a big hit for audiences and critics. Super Size Me was a stunt but an effective, metaphorical one. Spurlock's trip to the Middle East is crude because it is unnecessary and unthoughtful. Would his wife really let him risk his life as an embedded journalist in war-torn areas, while she has a baby on the way? Come on. I understand that Spurlock is suggesting he wants a safe world for his baby to grow up in, but his intentions are meaningless. He does not seem curious to explore what this safe world would be. There are some intelligent interviews with citizens who provide a middle voice for the turmoil in the Middle East. Some are indifferent, others involved, and some refuse to speak. I liked the scene when Spurlock wants to interview 2 selected students at a Saudi school. They are watched by their teachers as the interview commences, and when Spurlock asks them a question they look up in diffidence. It shows the censorship in schools in Saudi Arabia and how education is not inspiring opinion but closed minds. I can only assume that because Spurlock does not show us anything we have not seen on the news. Where In the World? is entertaining and that does not always come with documentaries. Like Super Size Me, it covers a timely topic but has fun with itself. I found Spurlock was more down to business in Super Size Me, whereas he has a flippancy here that is irritating. It is somewhat amusing to watch him mock Bin Laden through a Mortal Kombat video game, where Spurlock and him go mono a mono. It makes the film an absurdist exercise, which - by the title - one must assume it is. It is nicely absurd but its secondary messages on the Western misunderstandings of Middle East ethos is generalized. At one moment Spurlock suggests this is a place of terror where he would never want his child to grow up in. He frowns upon young children playing soccer in an execution courtyard. But does that mean those children are sad or unsafe? That decision is out of his hands. This is a documentary that is seemingly out of Spurlock's hands. Osama, whether he be dead or alive, more represents the absurd and fallacious assumptions of the American government and media, and how what they teach us is perhaps non-existent. Bin Laden is the symbol of lies. Spurlock knows that Bin Laden probably will never be found, so his journey to the MIddle East is an impossible one, unlike eating 3 meals a day at McDonalds. His absurdism is chuckling but the execution is pitiful. The film closes on empty messages about how we should treat the world and those foreign to us. I would have liked to see Spurlock a somewhat changed man out of this. I could have then believed his discoveries, or lack thereof. It all appears to be a manipulative shenanigan without any significant intentions. So Where In the World Is Osama Bin Laden? I dunno. Well duh!

SV G (kr) wrote: The documentary starts out to tell the story of a young girl, who at the age of 3 begins to paint what many in the art field saw as brilliant abstract paintings that were "good enough to hang in the museum of modern art". But mid way through the film (and without giving too much away) the film takes another turn and becomes far more interesting. It opens up a lot room for discussion on many counts. Did her parents hand away her childhood for fame, and bite of more than she could actually chew? Is the child actually doing the artwork herself, or being coached - or even assisted with the painting? Are the parents together on this journey for the right or the wrong of it, or is it dad who has his own agenda? It's very intreging and I would recommend to anyone. Be sure to watch the special features as well as it will add to how you view and surmise the documentary itself.

John B (gb) wrote: BASEketball is one humorous and creative film with Trey Parker and Matt Stone turning the sports world upside down.

Ben R (de) wrote: Whats not to like about this film, so so funny

Jude P (us) wrote: Why on earth this kind of crap being called movies ?

Jo Y (ag) wrote: A very good movie.1948 movie.

Jiashu X (mx) wrote: Lots of heart, lots of character growth, and one of the best novelties about the film is that you spend most of it watching Bolt's unconventional decisions knowing that he really doesn't know.

Preston (jp) wrote: THIS MOVIE IS A CLASSIC AND I LOVE EVERY BIT OF IT! Danny creeps me out lol. Frenchy is my favorite in the whole entire world! THE MUSIC IS AMAZING, THE ACTING IS AMAZING, THE DANCING IS AMAZING! It's really really funny!

Grant S (it) wrote: Decent sci-fi drama.Set in the year 2035, robots are commonplace and are becoming more and more sophisticated. A veteran cop, Del Spooner (played by Will Smith), is called in to investigate the apparent suicide of a friend and leading robotics expert, Dr Alfred Lanning (played by James Cromwell). He is quite cynical about robots and is convinced that a robot killed him. However, Lawrence Robertson (Bruce Greenwood), CEO of the corporation who designed and builds the robots, and that Dr Lanning worked for, isn't too happy with his investigations...Very intriguing, initially. Sort of a futuristic murder mystery, with a prime suspect a non-human. However, the movie does reveal its hand too soon, after which it is mostly just an action movie, unfortunately.Ultimately, entertaining enough. Just a pity the writer and director couldn't maintain the atmosphere of the first 30-40% of the movie and gave in to the temptation of making an action movie.Good performance by Will Smith in the lead role.

bill b (gb) wrote: not bad but still....

Manny C (ag) wrote: Taken from Joyce Carol Oates' hard-hitting short story 'Where Ar You Going, Where Have You Been?', Smooth Talk is the movie that put young Laura Dern on the map. She is wonderful in this film, matching Treat Williams step for step as he plays the mysterious Arnold Friend. This is one not to be missed.

Augustine H (ag) wrote: Maggie Smith once again shows why she is a legend. It's always a pleasure to watch her performance.