What the #$*! Do We (K)now!?

What the #$*! Do We (K)now!?

Amanda (Marlee Maitlin) is a divorced woman who makes a living as a photographer. During the Fall of the year Amanda begins to see the world in new and different ways when she begins to question her role in life, her relationships with her career and men and what it all means. As the layers to her everyday experiences fall away insertions in the story with scientists, and philosophers and religious leaders impart information directly to an off-screen interviewer about academic issues, and Amanda begins to understand the basis to the quantum world beneath. During her epiphany as she considers the Great Questions raised by the host of inserted thinkers, Amanda slowly comprehends the various inspirations and begins to see the world in a new way.

  • Rating:
    4.00 out of 5
  • Length:109 minutes
  • Release:2004
  • Language:German,English,Spanish
  • Reference:Imdb
  • Keywords:dance,   surrealism,   christian,  

"WHAT THE #$*! DO WE KNOW?!" is a radical departure from convention. It demands a freedom of view and greatness of thought so far unknown, indeed, not even dreamed of since Copernicus. It's... . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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What the #$*! Do We (K)now!? torrent reviews

Todd S (de) wrote: Sylvester Stallone had a brilliant idea that came to fruition in 2010, with an action movie that brought together all the big names in the action movie genre, but there was a problem. You just can't fit every big name into one movie and give them all significant screen time, so you had to have a sequel. The more things change, the more they stay the same, however, as this time, the story was a bit better, at least for an action movie, and the cast was a bit younger, but the basic genre was still the same. Barney Ross's (Sylvester Stallone) team is once again brought together to do a job, this time there are some new younger faces, to complete what seems like what should be an easy job, what they weren't expecting was to stumble right into the middle of a madman's master-plan. As I said, the story wasn't as basic this time, things were a little more complex, but on a basic level this is still you're typical shoot em up action film, with bodies and explosions constantly coming at you. What I did like was how they change things up a bit and didn't just feature the same actors, even though many members of the team were the same. The one thing the first film was severely lacking was youth, and I don't know about you, but I'd much rather see Liam Hemsworth fighting with his shirt off than Sylvester Stallone. All in all, the sequel doesn't differ that much from the original, but where it does, only helps the series. The cast is younger, the story is better, and the action hits harder. If you're an action junkie, it doesn't get more exciting than the Expendables and the sequel will have you craving a trilogy.

Emily N (kr) wrote: fitzcarraldo, served american style. yeah, there's a rudimentary intro to how the view of slavery in the south has been manipulated by the media throughout the years...but I mean, shit, they moved a house! neat shots of this feat and an interesting interaction between the descendants of the white landowners and the descendants of the slaves who worked on the plantation. A really disgusting mall where the old plantation used to be. this is such a subtle piece of work, it doesn't over-simplify relationships, and goddamn, they moved a HOUSE!

Anthony V (ca) wrote: Even Sheena Chou's sexy performance can't save this one.

Timothy S (us) wrote: A lot of it was kept under wraps until the publication of her semi-autobiographical novel, but Carrie Fisher led one of the more interesting lives in Hollywood during the early years of her life and career. That new novel is now a film called "Postcards From the Edge", with a screenplay by Fisher as well, and while there is plenty to admire here, the film version suffers from a severe split personality.The opening moments are quite good, with Fisher's on-screen alter-ego personified here by Meryl Streep overdosing and being committed to a treatment facility. Streep is very good in those scenes, at first denying her substance abuse problem before admitting them to her herself and those around her. Those wonderful dramatic moments, however, are soon there after interspersed with more lighthearted moments and that's where my problem with the picture lies. Taken separately, the comedy and the drama both work, they just don't mesh well together. In perhaps the film's best scene, the mood is perfectly set. It's the wonderfully melancholy moment in which Streep sings the Ray Charles classic "You Don't Know Me", and the wistfulness of that instance is never captured again. It finds just the right tone.The behind-the-scenes Hollywood stuff is terrific as well, as director Mike Nichols systematically shatters the illusion of filmmaking, and the vast array of glorified cameos are fun as well. "Postcards From the Edge" often feels like two very different movies at war with one another. The dramatic film should have won.

Justin T (fr) wrote: Emotional film with some great performances, but I felt let down by the resolution to the whole situation.