Zack and Miri Make a Porno

Zack and Miri Make a Porno

Lifelong platonic friends Zack and Miri look to solve their respective cash-flow problems by making an adult film together. As the cameras roll, however, the duo begin to sense that they may have more feelings for each other than they previously thought.

Zack and Miri are two lifelong platonic friends who make an adult film to pay the rent of their apartment. With their friend Delaney, the couple set out for auditionees for their porn film, but in the process of filming, they realize they feel more for each other than they had before. . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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Zack and Miri Make a Porno torrent reviews

shawna f (jp) wrote: it kinda sound good but then again it doesn't sound good so i don't know if it would be good at all

James M (ru) wrote: Quite possibly the stupidest film I have ever seen.

Mike C (jp) wrote: It held my attention, but overall is wasn't a good movie.

BobbiLeigh E (ca) wrote: The ending is AMAZING!!!!!!!!!!!!

David V (us) wrote: Worst Fassbinder movie I saw. Such a shame, I love his other stuff!

Tommy See the Treasure S (ru) wrote: So this movie has taken something of a thrashing from the critics so I feel compelled to defend it. Well, not really, but I will say that it's actually quite decent. It's not particularly ground-breaking and it's not without its flaws but it's a pretty honourable take on a well-worn tale of lust, sin and morality. For those who aren't in the know, the movie is based on Emile Zola's classic gothic-romance story 'Therese Raquin.' For some reason, although it's a very literal adaptation of the novel, they've opted for the original and pretty lame title: 'In Secret.' Interestingly enough, Zola's novel also inspired Park Chan-Wook's vampire horror movie (although the story is sadly devoid of vampires) 'Thirst'. This should give you some idea of the kind of tone that dominates this movie. This is a dark and sensual look at what humans are capable of doing in order to fulfil their desires, and the price to pay for our transgressions. Essentially it is a very traditional moral fable, in which a sense of tragedy and gloom is inevitable. Elizabeth Olsen plays Therese, a woman who at a young age comes to live with her Aunt, Madame Raquin(Jessica Lange), and her sickly cousin, Camille(Tom Felton). Living out her quiet life in the countryside, Therese is treated with only the most superficial kindness by her aunt, who prefers to dote upon her darling son. It is also Therese's duty to nurse and take care of her ill cousin. When Therese reaches maturity, she finds herself resenting the lifestyle which was so unjustly thrust upon her when she was a child. When it is proclaimed by her aunt that she is to marry Camille she is not surprised but visibly upset. Without the feeling that she has any alternative, Therese reluctantly enters into a repressed and sterile marriage with Camille. However, things radically change for Therese when she, her aunt, and her husband move to Paris, and they are introduced to a charming and enigmatic stranger named Laurent(Oscar Isaac). Therese seizes upon her chance to escape her inert life by entering a wild, passionate affair with Laurent. Things take a dark turn when, after weeks of secret trysts, Therese and her Parisian lover begin to contemplate how much easier things would be if Camille were out of the picture. First-time director Charlie Stratton does a good job in capturing the gothic atmosphere of Zola's novel and retaining the broad elements of the narrative. He portrays the French capital as a very bleak, misty place; the place which would bring about Therese's tragic fall from grace. He also succeeds in depicting the novel's playful sense of humour. The story more than a little mischievous in how it deals with Therese's blooming sexuality. In one scene she observes, moon-eyed, a topless stranger scything the country fields, a scene which evidently stirs her loins. There are other scenes in which humour and eroticism are playfully combined, such as when Laurent manages to conceal himself from Madame Raquin by crouching beneath Therese's Victorian hoop dress. Such moments of silly, bawdy comedy are not unwelcome in a movie where heavy themes of morality and guilt are prevalent. Elizabeth Olson solidifies her reputation as one of the most promising young actresses working today. She is one of those actresses, a bit like Samantha Morton or Emily Watson, who can easily convey a strong emotion without uttering so much as whisper. She gives a very three-dimensional and complex performance here, successfully capturing the various nuances of Therese's Raquin's character- from her resentment at her inert lifestyle, to her innocent desire to break into carnality, to her later remorse and guilt as a result of her wicked actions. Unsurprisingly, Oscar Isaac(who was so good in last year's 'Inside Llewyn Davis') has little difficulty in portraying a self-centred and charismatic Parisian lover. Tom Felton(who's probably best known as Draco Malfoy from the Harry Potter movies) is very good as the clueless and anaemic Camille. It is Jessica Lange, however, who steals the show as the somewhat unnerving Madame Raquin, who in the later stages of the movies seems kept alive only by her own scorn. These characters are all morally complex and difficult to pin down. As with the novel the story's heroine is alternately sympathetic and despicable. Few won't feel some degree of pity for her in the early scenes where she seems a tragic victim of circumstance, but many will probably find themselves losing sympathy for her as the story progresses. I found her to be an invariably interesting heroine. All in all this is a very fine and faithful, albeit unspectacular, adaptation of a classic story.

Stuart M (us) wrote: SPOILERS AHEADAbout the most pointless film I've ever seen. After a slow start that seems to be competing with 2001 for showing all of space bureaucracy, though not nearly as effectively or to any purpose, the plot finally kicks in about halfway through the film. There's another planet directly opposite ours that always stays on the opposite side of the sun. A crew is sent to explore it and promptly crashes only to find out they're mysteriously back on Earth. Gosh, I wonder where they could actually be. Could it possibly be an identical but opposite Earth?Admittedly this was made even more obvious since it was the plot of a Red Dwarf episode. It's a sad sad day when a TV comedy as silly as Red Dwarf can follow an idea through to its inevitable conclusion better than you can. Here the "differences" are idiotically simplistic and meaningless, like the fact that people are left-handed and write backwards. Hey, just like a mirror, get it? A mirror world? Isn't that clever! At least Red Dwarf added some interesting differences, like the fact that time was passing backwards. Worse yet we're expected to take this concept seriously here when five seconds' thought would show how dumb it is. And this mystery is the main conflict for the last forty minutes.And then everybody dies. No, I'm not even kidding about that. With no idea where to go once their boring revelation has been made they decide to simply kill off all the characters in an (admittedly pretty cool) explosion, except for one man who's shown years later in a retirement home recounting this story to a nurse. Note that this is the first time we have even a hint that this film is being told in flashback. Pathos? Mystery? Bah! And in a crowning moment of lameness that brings our film to its long overdue end, the old man sees his reflection in a mirror and charges at it in his wheelchair smashing into it and killing himself. Because it's a mirror world! Get it? Pretty clever, huh?I've never seen a film try so hard to be intelligent and thought-provoking without even having one single creative idea. This film is a waste of celluloid. Not even bad enough to be charmingly awful, except in the final minutes. Avoid.